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1978 KZ1000-A2 "Barn find" 30 May 2020 16:24 #826960

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cb900f wrote: That seat tho...... :evil:


I can't wait to get rid of that thing. I think it was taken from a '76 or '77 as the pan doesn't have the hook for the seat catch.

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1978 KZ1000-A2 "Barn find" 30 May 2020 16:32 #826962

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The one in my 78 was like and sounded like sitting on a bag of potato chips it was a real Kawakup
76 kz 900 1075 76 kz 900 a4 78 kz 1000 ltd

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1978 KZ1000-A2 "Barn find" 30 May 2020 17:44 #826968

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Amazing, the bike needs work but seems like a great project. Can't believe the other two people weren't interested at this price.
1978 Kawasaki KZ-1000 LTD

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1978 KZ1000-A2 "Barn find" 30 May 2020 18:04 #826970

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Rick H. wrote: You could break those brackets by simply walking into them by accident, or trying to use them to muscle the bike around in the garage. I am glad you decided to try to bring this bike back to life. No doubt it will cost you some money and time, but in the end it will be well worth the effort I think and the personal satisfaction will no doubt be enormous. Besides, $500 for this bike would have been robbery.
Rick H.


For sure it's going to cost me money. Browsing for parts online I keep thinking "oh that's not too bad" until I remember that's in USD and the Canadian dollar is garbage right now.

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1978 KZ1000-A2 "Barn find" 30 May 2020 18:05 #826971

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Kofla wrote: Amazing, the bike needs work but seems like a great project. Can't believe the other two people weren't interested at this price.


They were certainly interested. Just didn't want to deal with the wrath of their wives if they brought home *another* bike.

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1978 KZ1000-A2 "Barn find" 30 May 2020 18:14 #826972

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You may be right about their wives, but I would be kicking myself severely for letting your bike slip through my fingers for a mere $500.00!

Rick H.
Rick H.

1977 Kawasaki KZ-1000A1

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1978 KZ1000-A2 "Barn find" 30 May 2020 18:30 #826974

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May I make a suggestion. Get the bike running first. Make sure there is nothing major wrong before fixing turn signals. It’s not a bad thing though while your sorting out the major components I.e. engine and brakes, to go over the bike and make a list of items that need to be addressed. One thing I’d suggest is checking the combustion chambers and confirm the are clear of criter stuff, nuts, nest, and such. Once that is confirmed, pull the plugs and start adding small amounts of oils every few days to start knocking out the rust before you attemp to kick it over. Make sure you do your due diligence to thwart off new critters. Keep the intake, exhaust, and plug openings sealed up in between oil baths.

Keep in mind your starting with a really complete bike that beyond sentimental cost you have very little cost upfront. I have seen this bike sell for 6-8 k. It’s worth the sweat equity and cost to revive it.
1976 KZ 900 A4
1976 KZ 900 B1 LTD
1978 KZ 1000 B2 LTD
Kowledge Speaks, But Wisdom Listens.
Jimi Hendrix.
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1978 KZ1000-A2 "Barn find" 30 May 2020 18:43 #826975

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Mikaw wrote: May I make a suggestion. Get the bike running first. Make sure there is nothing major wrong before fixing turn signals. It’s not a bad thing though while your sorting out the major components I.e. engine and brakes, to go over the bike and make a list of items that need to be addressed. One thing I’d suggest is checking the combustion chambers and confirm the are clear of criter stuff, nuts, nest, and such. Once that is confirmed, pull the plugs and start adding small amounts of oils every few days to start knocking out the rust before you attemp to kick it over. Make sure you do your due diligence to thwart off new critters. Keep the intake, exhaust, and plug openings sealed up in between oil baths.

Keep in mind your starting with a really complete bike that beyond sentimental cost you have very little cost upfront. I have seen this bike sell for 6-8 k. It’s worth the sweat equity and cost to revive it.


I'm not ordering a single part until I can get this thing running. Just tinkering and making a list right now. We are pretty confident she'll fire up. I started to pull the exhaust the other day so I could take a peek and make sure they were clear, but the nuts needed another soak first.
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1978 KZ1000-A2 "Barn find" 30 May 2020 18:53 #826976

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Put a little oil in each cylinder before you try to kick it over. Cost me $500+ due to dry starts.
Steve
Z1b1000 1975 Z1b
Opinions expressed by me do not reflect those of the the staff or members
kzrider.com/forum/11-projects/598262-kz-...-will-it-live#672882
kzrider.com/forum/2-engine/597654-poser?start=240#704229
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1978 KZ1000-A2 "Barn find" 30 May 2020 19:11 #826977

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Ive found the electrical connectors can get to be brittle and corroded, Diablo Cycle was a great help
76 kz 900 1075 76 kz 900 a4 78 kz 1000 ltd

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1978 KZ1000-A2 "Barn find" 30 May 2020 20:03 #826980

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Good course of direction. Be careful when removing the side covers. The grommets might be hard. Try to reach to the back of the mounting tabs and push them out instead of pulling on the covers. Also keep all factory parts, even if you plan to upgrade. Example would be the air box... they are expensive to replace and even harder to find...

I went back and looked at the “washed” bike. Cleaned up really well. What did you use? Looks to have removed most of the corrosion and crud.
1976 KZ 900 A4
1976 KZ 900 B1 LTD
1978 KZ 1000 B2 LTD
Kowledge Speaks, But Wisdom Listens.
Jimi Hendrix.

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1978 KZ1000-A2 "Barn find" 31 May 2020 09:00 #827001

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Mikaw wrote: Good course of direction. Be careful when removing the side covers. The grommets might be hard. Try to reach to the back of the mounting tabs and push them out instead of pulling on the covers. Also keep all factory parts, even if you plan to upgrade. Example would be the air box... they are expensive to replace and even harder to find...

I went back and looked at the “washed” bike. Cleaned up really well. What did you use? Looks to have removed most of the corrosion and crud.


Unfortunately the side grommets are all toast. My brother apparently rolled it out a few years back to see if it would start, and wasn't exactly gentle.

Plan is to keep everything as stock as possible. Was originally going to do pods until we found the air box silencer on the other end of the farm yard. $300 on eBay?!?!

I just sprayed the bike down with super clean degreaser, let it sit for a couple minutes, then rinsed it off with a weak pressure washer.

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